Info

Vinyl Emergency

Musicians, record label owners, visual artists and beyond describe how the influential medium of vinyl has shaped their lives and careers.
RSS Feed Subscribe in Apple Podcasts
Vinyl Emergency
2024
May
April
March
February
January


2023
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2022
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2021
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2020
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2019
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2018
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


All Episodes
Archives
Now displaying: 2024
May 21, 2024

"I don't have stage fright, I have life fright." Indiana native Timothy Showalter -- the mind and voice behind the moniker Strand of Oaks -- has pulled no punches when it comes to combatting his own childhood trauma and lifelong anxieties through music. And while he says that touring and performing puts him in his most zen state, he has experienced a death or sorts with the guitar-centered music Strand of Oaks has done until now. His upcoming album Miracle Focus finds him piloting synthesizers and crafting, what he calls, "a manual for my life. A soundtrack to connection." And despite a drastic instrumental shift, the core of Miracle Focus is still within the hopeful sonic palette that Showalter is known for. On today's second visit to Vinyl Emergency, he also discusses having a song go #1 in Belgium, what got him kicked out of Moby's restaurant, and his recent TV role on the Sons of Anarchy spin-off, Mayans MC. Visit strandofoaks.net for social media, tour dates and to pre-order Miracle Focus before it drops June 7th.

May 8, 2024
To say The Long Winters had some bad luck getting their music on vinyl would be an understatement: After a hurricane in the mid-2000's sent most copies of an exclusive box set into the Atlantic Ocean, the band struck a relationship last year with Bandbox -- an LP-subscription service doing limited, colored pressings of modern classics and out-of-print material -- only to have the company go suddenly belly-up, leaving the albums pressed, but under the ownership of Bandbox's investors, as collateral. Thankfully, Barsuk Records (the influential Seattle label which the band called home for their entire tenure) has come through with standard black pressings, allowing die-hard fans to finally add 2003’s majestic and acclaimed When I Pretend to Fall and more of the catalog to their shelf. On today's show, Long Winters lead singer/guitarist and songwriter John Roderick dissects the Bandbox fiasco, his infatuation with acid rock at an early age, and how he recently ended up on a Las Vegas party bus with 90’s rockers Ugly Kid Joe. Find more info on the Long Winters vinyl reissues at barsuk.com, check out the band’s new rarities compilation So Good At Waiting wherever you stream music, and follow @johnroderick on Instagram and Threads.
Apr 23, 2024

Esquire editor-at-large and former MTV VJ Dave Holmes discusses how his ADHD allowed him to embrace the chaos of live television, why hitting up a NYC vinyl listening bar with The Mandalorian didn't go exactly as planned, and his new podcast docuseries examining MTV's cultural impact. Subscribe to Who Killed the Video Star?: The Story of MTV wherever you get podcasts, and follow @daveholmes on Instagram and Threads.

Apr 17, 2024

Hello! For my day job, I host and produce Looped In: Chicago, a podcast for WBBM Newsradio. And this week, they allowed me to make an episode all about the city's ties, past and present, to the record industry. So while it's different from your typical Vinyl Emergency episode, I hope you'll find this one to be an equally engaging listen, with guests including Evan Weiss of Into It. Over It., Smashed Plastic Record Pressing co-owner Steve Polutnik, Chicago Reader columnist Steve Krakow and music history TikTok sensation Patrick Hicks. Subscribe to Looped In: Chicago wherever you get podcasts, and new VE episodes will come your way soon.

Apr 9, 2024

This is an encore presentation of a previous episode, originally airing in December 2020.


On today's show, keyboardist Derry deBorja (of Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit) talks about the musical influence of his older brother, his time as a member of Son Volt, how experimenting with a modular synth has changed how he views composition, and the 400 Unit's relationship with David Letterman. Visit jasonisbell.com for updates, and follow Derry on Instagram, @tin_pony.

Mar 12, 2024

Since his last visit to Vinyl Emergency in August 2020, Nashville singer/songwriter Ruston Kelly has narrowly escaped a fiery bus explosion, sold off nearly every physical stage piece from his last tour, and rehabbed an old Victorian bungalow with his own two hands. And while all of these experiences are worth talking about, today he says that being a better listener has been a focused priority as of late. This deliberate intention to say less and observe more has led to a run of rewarding collaborations over the last several years: Duets with Caitlyn Smith and Judah & the Lion, co-producing an LP for John Prine's son Tommy, and touring with the massively-popular Noah Kahan. On this week's episode, Ruston dives deep into the first album he remembers as a child, why he sequences songs specifically for vinyl, and his upcoming EP -- Weakness, Etc. -- a combination of new material and reworkings from his third full-length The Weakness, released last year. Plus, anecdotes on sharing toast with Jackson Browne, and debating Pop-Tarts with his fans. Ruston's upcoming solo acoustic tour begins later this month. Tickets, social media and more are at rustonkelly.com, with Weakness, Etc. dropping March 22.

Feb 27, 2024
In bands like Volcano Choir, Pele, Vermont and Collections of Colonies of Bees, guitarist Chris Rosenau has actively sought out a unique ambiguity. Whether through off-kilter tunings, a myriad of loop pedals or long-form improvisations in 130-degree heat, he says he finds his most interesting work comes from trusting others. And that trust has built fruitful creative relationships with enigmatic drummer Jon Mueller, Bon Iver's Justin Vernon and Sylvan Esso's Nick Sanborn, among others. But in a career of disarming listeners through unexpected approaches, Chris admits his most quizzical move might be in the form of a recently-released debut solo album, where he's stripped everything back to one acoustic guitar, for a tender salute to his late mother. The album, titled 'a light that cracks through,' is now available at chrisrosenau.bandcamp.com. Follow @rosno on Instagram.
Feb 6, 2024
While on the Milwaukee Brewers roster in 2011, major league pitcher John Axford created a buzz among indie-rock baseball nerds by forgoing the standard jock jams and using Refused's "New Noise" as his game entrance music. While exposing thousands to the Swedish hardcore band’s chaotic screams and atonal, pummeling instrumentation, the choice also garnered some vocal complaints from opposing coaches and TV announcers. Nonetheless, Axford led the entire National League in saves that season, so who knows if some of the song's lyrics ("Good frames won't save bad paintings") don't indeed secretly speak to pitching. Around this same time, his interest in vinyl records began to blossom, leading him to hunt down Japanese Metallica pressings and connect again with his family’s classic Christmas LP’s. Since then "The Ax Man," as fans have dubbed him, has reached the World Series (with the 2013 St. Louis Cardinals), and done time with the Pirates, Dodgers and Blue Jays, among other organizations. Most recently, Axford represented his home country of Canada in last year’s World Baseball Classic. On this episode, we explore how his dad's vintage Edison phonograph somewhat influenced Axford’s current big budget stereo set-up, his fandom for LP subscription service Vinyl Me, Please and why he won't clean his grandparents' fingerprints off their old records. We also dive into John's recent trip overseas, to a quaint Dutch village where his great uncle's heroism during WWII is cemented and honored forever. Follow @johnaxford on Instagram. PLUS, music this week from Milwaukee band Dramatic Lovers!
Jan 23, 2024

At just 16 years old, Amy Fleisher Madden was contributing to her surrounding Florida punk rock scene like a wily veteran. Through booking and promoting national bands visiting the panhandle -- as well as her DIY zine Fiddler Jones -- she had introduced, connected and championed emo, pop-punk and hardcore bands from all over, eventually leading to the start of Fiddler Records, which gave us the first releasees from Dashboard Confessional and New Found Glory. Most recently, Amy is the author of a hefty book documenting a decade of the scene, titled "Negatives: A Photographic Archive of Emo (1996-2006)." Filled with stunning visuals, emphatic essays and more -- plus contributions from various photographers and musicians -- it's a must-have for anyone who spent time in this particular genre during these particular years, or since. Purchase "Negatives" via Amazon or wherever you get literature. More info can be found via @amyxmadden on Instagram, or at amy-madden.com.

1