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Vinyl Emergency

Musicians, album collectors and others who celebrate vinyl records describe how this influential medium has shaped their lives and careers. Previous guests: Hozier, Rosanne Cash, Creed Bratton of NBC's The Office, plus members of Foo Fighters, Wilco, Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers and Hall & Oates.
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Vinyl Emergency
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Now displaying: November, 2019
Nov 19, 2019

After years of playing upright bass for cult country act BR5-49, Jay McDowell stumbled into a dream job for any music geek: Multimedia Archivist for Nashville's Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum, established in 2006. From the actual drumkit Santana's Michael Shrieve played at Woodstock to the original lathe used to cut Elvis Presley's first recording to hand-written lyrics from some of the greatest songwriters ever, the MHFM is a literal treasure trove of artifacts and memorabilia that speaks both to the brilliance of music's biggest stars as well as the ingenuity of those behind the scenes. To Jay's end, he wears many hats day-to-day, whether giving private tours to everyone from school kids to the musicians themselves who are being honored, on top of video production, archival research and assisting with the presentation of specific exhibits. On today's program, recorded at the Russell Hotel in Nashville, Jay speaks to his own history with vinyl, how historical context can morph a good song into a classic, why we continue to absorb and collect music even though it's impossible to hear everything, and he shares plenty of stories behind some of the MHFM's coolest acquisitions and inductions, involving Elvis Presley, Velma Smith, Howlin' Wolf, Willie Nelson and Bob Dylan. For more information on the Musicians Hall of Fame & Museum or to plan your trip today, visit musicianshalloffame.com. On Instagram, follow @musicianshalloffame.

Nov 5, 2019
Today, we focus on R.E.M.'s polarizing yet passionate ninth album from 1994, Monster. Craft Recordings just released a 25th anniversary package available on 1LP, 2LP, 2CD or 5CD/1Blu-Ray formats, available at remhq.com or wherever you buy music.
 
Growing up, renowned visual artist Chris Bilheimer's first introduction to what record covers looked like was -- serendipitously -- by staring at R.E.M.'s early classics like Murmur. In his words, he's since spent his career "stumbling into little tiny pockets of music history," creating landmark album artwork for iconic groups like Neutral Milk Hotel, Weezer and Green Day. Since the mid-90's, Chris has been R.E.M.'s official in-house art director, collaborating directly with frontman Michael Stipe on new releases, deluxe reissues, compilation packages and more. Today, Chris shares some remarkable stories about rebuilding the Monster artwork from scratch for this re-release, how stacks of portfolios containing original R.E.M. cover art were nearly lost forever, working with Jeff Mangum on the visuals for In The Aeroplane Over The Sea and how Chris' design for American Idiot may have helped save a child's life. Visit bilheimer.com to get a snapshot of his work through the years.
 
In 2002, trailblazing music journalist Matthew Perpetua started Fluxblog, one of the web's first MP3 blogs, setting the course for how artists were discovered and music would be consumed in the 21st century. Since then, he's become a music editor for BuzzFeed and a contributing writer to outlets like Pitchfork and Rolling Stone. In this episode, Matthew details his first memories of R.E.M., why he was particularly chosen to contribute liner notes to the Monster anniversary project and how this record makes more sense in 2019 than it may have in 1994. Keep up with Matthew via fluxblog.org or Twitter, @perpetua.
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