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Vinyl Emergency

Interviews and anecdotes centered around our connection to vinyl records, featuring musicians, album collectors, LP manufacturers and beyond.
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Now displaying: July, 2017
Jul 21, 2017
2017 marks a big vinyl year for veteran singer/songwriter Rosanne Cash: Written primarily about the lives and deaths of her mother, father and step-mother (Vivian Liberto, Johnny Cash and June Carter-Cash, respectively), her 2006 record Black Cadillac was just pressed for the first time by Capitol as part of their 75th anniversary, and a 30th anniversary reissue of King's Record Shop -- the first LP to ever give a female country singer four number one Billboard singles from one album -- was also recently released by Sony Legacy/Columbia.

Today, Rosanne discusses those albums making their way back to vinyl, her adoration for detailed liner notes, fair pay for artists in a digital world, the message she had carved into the dead wax of the first press of 1981's Seven Year Ache and spending an entire Christmas transfixed by the Beatles' White Album. We also talk about her role in the restoration of her father's boyhood home and her upcoming performance at the Johnny Cash Heritage Festival in Dyess, AR. Follow @RosanneCash
 on Facebook and Twitter! 
Jul 14, 2017
Texas native John Congleton's production, engineering and mixing résumé is as diverse as they come, spanning projects with everyone from Blondie to The Roots & Erykah Badu to Angel Olsen to Talking Heads' David Byrne to gospel legend Kirk Franklin. A Grammy-winner for his work on St. Vincent's 2014 self-titled album, Congleton also fronted The Paper Chase for over a decade, crafting some of the most feverishly manic and intriguing music known within indie-rock -- thanks to, in his words today, being "willing to destroy the integrity of a completely reasonable song for the effect of an audio hallucination." Last year saw the release of his first post-Paper Chase album under The Nighty Nite moniker, titled "Until The Horror Goes," and he's already produced five albums that have come out so far in 2017 from Nelly Furtado, Blondie, Future Islands, Xiu Xiu and Goldrapp. On this episode, Congleton recalls his early memories of ZZ Top and Fawlty Towers, the influence of Pink Floyd, Public Enemy and the BBC Radiophonic Workshop on the Paper Chase, what artists of all walks ultimately want from an engineer or producer, where exactly he keeps his Grammy and why we're still fascinated with the Zodiac Killer. Be sure to follow him @congletonjohn on Twitter and Instagram!
Jul 7, 2017

Despite dubbing themselves a "baby band" when comparing their short history in the music business to those that have championed their work, Muscle Shoals, Alabama siblings Lydia and Laura Rogers have a strong connection to the history and romanticism of vinyl records. From putting on mini-concerts for each other on their parents' waterbed -- in sync with Highway 101 and Linda Ronstadt albums -- to Jack White recording and putting the duo to vinyl for the first time, the Secret Sisters' love for the medium matches their undeniable devotion to the art of songwriting. Since that first Third Man seven-inch, they've continued to work with producers who eye authenticity as an integral part of their aesthetic: the legendary T. Bone Burnett, current Nashville staple Dave Cobb and most recently Brandi Carlile, who helmed the Sisters' emotional new album You Don't Own Me Anymore, a title that speaks volumes to the trials and tribulations of heartache, bankruptcy and professional distress that nearly killed the Sisters' career since their last record. Today, Lydia and Laura sit down to discuss touring United Record Pressing and watching their first vinyl release being pressed, why vinyl continues to be the measurement by which the Sisters gauge how well their own albums sound, how You Don't Own Me Anymore's exemplary cover art is a familial response to their recent struggles, and some stellar stories involving Levon Helm, Fiona Apple, Elton John and human-sized catfish. Visit SecretSistersBand.com for tour dates, social media and more.

 
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